08 December 2011

Seasonal Recipe: Okonomiyaki (Japanese Cabbage Pancakes)

Recipe by Katherine Deumling Cook With What You Have 

Katherine Deumling is a native of Portland, Oregon, and runs the cooking school Cook With What You Have. She is passionate about our regions farms and farmers markets and helping people cook more often and have more fun in the kitchen. She also creates recipe packets for CSA members for several local farms. Katherine is a board member of Slow Food USA and the former chair of Slow Food Portland.

Purple Scallions, Photo by Allison Jones

Okonomiyaki (Japanese Cabbage Pancakes)

Green Cabbage is sweet, perfect and plentiful this time of year and this dish will convert even die-hard cabbage skeptics. These pancakes traditionally include finely chopped shrimp so by all means add this if you’d like. I love them as is, just with cabbage and scallions though. They are great party food and just as good for a simple supper with a salad on the side.

Makes about 12 pancakes.

Sauce

Scant ½ cup mayo
Scant 2 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon sriracha

Pancakes

4 large eggs
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 – 11/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/3 cup all purpose flour
3-4 cups cabbage, finely sliced or shredded in the food processor
1 bunch scallions, trimmed and chopped
sunflower, coconut or peanut oil for frying
1-2 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

Photo by Katherine Deumling

Whisk the first set of ingredients together for your sauce. Set aside while you make the pancakes.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk eggs with the soy sauce, sesame oil, and salt. Gradually add the flour until incorporated. Fold in cabbage and scallions.

Warm a couple glugs of oil in a skillet over medium-high heat until glistening. Ladle the batter into the skillet as you would for regular old pancakes. I usually make them about the size of saucer. Cook on each side for about 3 minutes or until golden brown. Keep pancakes covered in a warm oven as you make the rest. Scatter sesame seeds on top of pancakes and serve with dipping sauce.

2 Responses

  1. Miriam Garcia

    I just made these, with shrimp, and they were wonderful. I also used rice flour instead of wheat, which worked fine. Thank you! My daughter and I have always loved the Japanese veggie pancakes at Old Wives Tales, and now we know how to make them. As soon as we finished eating, my daughter pulled our ‘keeper’ recipe book off the shelf and had me copy down the recipe. Now we just have to figure out how to make the miso glaze they use…

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